Jan 2017 - 14 week class project - sponsored educational project by HP

HP Campfire creates livelier and more immersive meetings with a simple and unintrusive device. I helped shape the user experience of the app and the interactions with the device.

My Role

UX - user research, journey map, application and device workflows
Interaction - device gestures and interactions

Team

Mike Rito - Industrial Design
Ian Liao - Industrial Design
Matt Benkert - Branding + UI
Robin Chen - UX + Interaction

Brief

HP wanted us to design for the future of computing in 2022.

01. Problem

How can we improve the flow of conversation during meetings?

01. Distractions
02. Missed ideas
03. disorgnization

During a meeting, the flow is disrupted whenever people take their attention away from the main conversation to take notes. This causes them to miss information. After the meeting, the notes have gaps and are disorganized with missing information. It is dizzying trying to find the important information and highlights in the clutter.

Journey Map

We made a journey map as a tool for ourselves to better identify opportunity areas. The journey map also helped in communicating our findings to the representatives from HP.

A journey map that covers the lifecycle of a meeting

02. Objective

Put conversation into the forefront and make it more efficient to find important information

03. Solution

Focusing on the experience and letting the technology fall into the background

01. Communicate
02. Document
03. Retrieve

Campfire is a device that records a transcript of the meeting and generates meeting notes that can be viewed on any device. It supports professionals by making communication a priority and moving documentation into the background.

how it works

General Overview - video timestamp @ 0:38

01. Communicate and Document

During the meeting, Campfire documents while you talk. Unintrusive ambient feedback from the device while it records allows users to be engaged in the conversation, instead of focused on the technology.

Manual Highlighting - video timestamp @ 1:06

02. highlight insights

While campfire records and highlights insights automatically based on keywords and preset tags, users can also highlight key ideas by tapping the side of the device.

Center Hub - video timestamp @ 1:23

03. Review and Edit

At the end of the meeting, users can go over highlights and recorded action items. It's possible to delete unwanted highlights.

Outline - video timestamp @ 1:59

04. Retrieve

After the meeting, you can view the meeting outline on the app. It’s comprehensive and creates a complete picture for everyone, even the people who weren’t present. It is organized so task items and highlights are displayed first.

04. our approach and process

Problem definition and learning from observation, interviews, and feedback

Device interface and form prototype for ergonomics study

01. observations
02. interviews
03. iterations

Our project timeline spanned 14 weeks from January to April 2017. We spent our first 6 weeks on problem definition and ideating on what the future of computing might be, 6 weeks on refining our ideas with feedback, and 2 weeks on our final presentation to stakeholders. Our target audience was already defined for us by HP. They wanted us to design a product for Generation Z. We presented and supported our ideas with what we learned from interviews, observations, market research and competitive analysis.

To learn more about our initial directions, and ideas that didn't make the cut, please request our 200-something page process book from me robincdesign@gmail.com. Feel free to reach out to me if you have any additional questions. I'd be happy to chat.

We first did market and competitive research. Market research helped us learn we would want to tackle something that could help meetings be more frictionless and currently what was available in the market could be improved upon. This helped us form our initial assumptions for potential device requirements that we later confirmed from the observations and interviews.

Ideating on possible scenarios for the "Future of Computing" 

Observations

We used observations to understand the environment in which our users would be using our product and what their unconscious habits were during meetings. We chose to observe meetings that were common in an agile work environment, such as a weekly team meeting, a stand-up, and a one-one meeting. We noted things such as devices used and communication flow. We also learned of any unspoken user wants and needs

This greatly influenced our industrial design strategy for our device and learning what qualities would be valuable for a physical meeting tool. For me, observing these meetings helped me learn what was being recorded in meeting notes, key phrases that came up frequently, and the technological friction points.

Interviews

We conducted interviews in-person onsite at people's workplaces and over Skype. These interviews were broad in scope because we wanted further context on meeting cultures. At this point we had not made a lot of design decisions yet such as what the device would look like or if we would even want a digital application. Our goal was to learn about the main pain points and if solving meeting frictions was a topic worth pursuing.

We made an effort to interview people who worked in different roles and company cultures, but we mostly interviewed people who worked in technology because of time restraints. We knew these people had hectic brainstorming meetings regardless of role so it fit our scope of what we wanted to learn more about and the tight timeline. If we had more time we would have recruited more people who worked outside of tech.

The one-on-one interviews taught us a lot about what happened after meetings that we couldn't observe entirely during a meeting, such as organization and knowledge management problems. It mainly influenced us in defining the problem, that the current technology used in meetings was distracting and isolating.

Prioritizing the insights

“I don’t want a transcript - The beauty of when someone is taking notes is they know what is important to capture.

- John, Design Director at Kelton

Being present and active

“I’m more interested in whats happening in the room so I just assume someone else will [take notes].”

-Vlad, Strategic Designer at BCGDV

Sharing notes

“We have a meeting database we can reference. But it’s only helpful if someone in the group is willing to put in the effort [to contribute]. A lot of times people just take their own notes.”

-Nicole, Financial Analyst at LinkedIn

Following up after meetings

“I usually try to document as much as I can, because I can’t always remember everything after the meeting.

- Rachel, Program Analyst at UCI

Interviewing a software engineer and researcher at UCI

Interviewing a design strategist from BCGDV

iterations

My industrial design teammates worked mostly on the physical device's form factor while I and the graphic designer worked on the application. However there was still a lot of team collaboration and communication on the main design strategies and all aspects of the physical device and app.

For the app, we started off by having team discussions on what our "ideal" meeting outline would look like and we all mocked up ideas. This helped put all of us on the same page and have visual aids when having the conversation. It helped us identify the main features we would like to have on our application.

Our team notes on layout ideas

This helped us create our first iteration. In this iteration, we had infinite scroll so that users could scroll chronologically through all their notes.  We wanted the information to be easily accessible so the meeting notes were the first thing users saw. We showed only highlighted comments. We didn't want to overload the user with information by showing a full transcript.

But this design had problems with navigating through the heavy content, not showing enough information for context when needed, and information overload. This design managed to be shallow and overwhelming at the same time.

This iteration helped us lock in the main features we wanted, but it needed further refinement. We learned that our experience needed to be more granular to provide more context and control. It also needed to be more dimensional and have different levels of highlights living in different areas of the app.

The first iteration of the application

Our project timeline lasted for 14 weeks from January to April 2017. We spent our first 6 weeks on ideating on what the future of computing would be and problem definition, 6 weeks on refining our idea with feedback, and 2 weeks on our final presentation to stakeholders. Our target audience was already defined for us by HP. They wanted us to design a product for Generation Z. We presented and supported our ideas with what we learned from interviews, observations, market research and competitive analysis.

To learn more about our initial directions, and ideas that didn't make the cut, please request our 200-something page process book from me robincdesign@gmail.com. Feel free to reach out to me if you have any additional questions. I'd be happy to chat.

We first did market and competitive research. Market research helped us learn we would want to tackle something that could help meetings be more frictionless and currently what was available in the market could be improved upon. This helped us form our initial assumptions for potential device requirements that we later confirmed from the observations and interviews.

Preparing for a stakeholder presentation

Observations

“I usually try to document as much as I can, because I can’t always remember”

Rachel, Program Analyst at UCI

We used observations to understand the environment our users would be using our product and what their unconscious habits were during meetings. We chose to observe meetings that were common in an agile work environment, such as a weekly team meeting, a stand-up, and a one-one meeting. We noted things such as devices used and communication flow.

This greatly influenced our industrial design strategy for our device and learning what qualities would be valuable for a physical meeting tool. For me, observing these meetings helped me learn what was being recorded in meeting notes, key phrases that came up frequently, and the technological friction points.

Weekly Team Meeting

Stand-up

One-on-one meeting

Interviews

“I don’t want a transcript - The beauty of when someone is taking notes is they know what is important to capture.

John, Design Director at Kelton

We conducted interviews in-person onsite at people's workplaces and over Skype. These interviews were broad in topic and for further context on meeting cultures. At this point we had not made a lot of design decisions yet such as what the device would look like or if we would even want a digital application. Our goal was to learn about the main pain points and if solving meeting frictions was a topic worth pursuing.

We made an effort to interview people who worked in different roles and company cultures, but we mostly interviewed people who worked in technology because of time restraints. We knew these people had hectic brainstorming meetings regardless of role so it fit our scope of what we wanted to learn more about and the tight timeline. If we had more time we would have recruited more people who worked outside of tech.

The one-on-one interviews taught us a lot about what happened after meetings that we couldn't observe entirely during a meeting, such as organization and knowledge management problems. It mainly influenced us in defining the problem, that the current technology used in meetings was distracting and isolating.

Interviewing a software engineer and researcher at UCI

Interviewing a design strategist from BCGDV

iterations

My industrial design teammates worked mostly on the physical device's form factor while I and the graphic designer worked on the application. However there was still a lot of team collaboration and communication on the main design strategies and all aspects of the physical device and app.

For the app, we started off by having team discussions on what our "ideal" meeting outline would look like and we all mocked up ideas. This helped put all of us on the same page and have visual aids when having the conversation. It helped us identify the main features we would like to have on our application.

Our team notes on layout ideas

This helped us create our first iteration. In this iteration, we had infinite scroll so that users could scroll chronologically through all their notes.  We wanted the information to be easily accessible so the meeting notes were the first thing users saw. We showed only highlighted comments. We didn't want to overload the user with information by showing a full transcript.

But this design had problems with navigating through the heavy content, not showing enough information for context when needed, and information overload. This design managed to be shallow and overwhelming at the same time.

This iteration helped us lock in the main features we wanted, but it needed further refinement. We learned that our experience needed to be more granular to provide more context and control. It also needed to be more dimensional and have different levels of highlights living in different areas of the app.

The first iteration of the application

05. Application Design

Informational, Dimensional, and Comprehensive

Feed

This shows the most recent meetings and tasks delegated to the user. Clicking on one of the cards takes you to the meeting overview.

Project Page

All meetings that happen for a project are grouped and stored in project pages, which makes it easy for team members to find and view them.

meeting overview

The meeting overview has high-level information in the form of cards. It shows what tasks were assigned, who was present, and high-level insights.

Transcript

This shows the full meeting transcript. All the highlights are on the left and the full transcript is on the right. Users can search for specific information using the search bar and filters.

06. automatic Note tags

Using NLP and keywords for highlights

There are automatic tags for excitement, ideas, insights and statistics. We came to these categories from common phrases we heard during meetings. We also looked at what people would highlight in their notes. Automatic tagging would detect keywords spoken then log a corresponding phrase or record the phrase the keyword is a part of.

We did not work with any subject matter experts on this. These categories and identifiers are based off our own assumptions and acted as a base proposal for approaching automatic tags if a company had more budget and research.

insights

Input

Robin
What was one of your takeaways from this exercise, Mike?

Mike
It was interesting how these coffee shops are afternoon social hubs for productivity

Key Identifiers

Takeaways
Tags the corresponding phrase under insight, a word used for talking about insights

Mike

Tracks the person’s voice for what insight they say

Where it’s Logged

Insights
This is a separate category from ideas because this is for revelations and conclusions.
This tag would be useful for retrospective meetings and group working sessions.

Capturing Emotion

Input

IanWhat if we worked with local musicians?

MattThis is a great idea! Emphasizing the social aspect by working with local musicians would be a new approach.

MikeThis idea could really target their consumer segment, from our surveys 82% of the community attends music events at least once a month.


All meeting members
Oooh - Great - Awesome!

Key Identifiers

Ooh, Great, Awesome
Highlights recent conversation under excitement

Idea, This idea could

Tracks the corresponding phrase
or the phrase before it

82%, at least once a month
Records the phrase it is a part of

Where it’s Logged

Excitement
Tracks sounds and words for enthusiasm so people can see which parts of the meeting are causing elevated emotion.

Ideas
Tags ideas for easy reference, mostly relies on synonyms of the word "idea" because of what we noticed people draw and highlight in their written notes.

Statistics
This is information that people may want to reference later. We noticed that every now and then, people would bring up statistics that everyone would take notes on or make a note of in their notes.

07. What I learned

Fostering better team discussions and dynamics

Preparing for stakeholder presentation

01. better group dynamics
02. Working w/stakeholders

From this project I learned more about being a better teammate. I learned how to encourage productive discussion and ideas instead of shutting them down because of my own biases. Learning that really helped me in future group projects and foster better collaboration.

It was also my first experience presenting to stakeholders. I learned about how framing the solution to stakeholders is important. It doesn't matter how much research and iteration was done if it's communicated improperly. I also learned that you have to be flexible when working with stakeholders and we have to know when to pivot based on feedback.

06. Next steps: measuring success

Adoption and Happiness

While this was a conceptual design and we

Do the users feel that this devices has helped them save time and have more meaningful meetings?